Successful Treatment of Chronic Lyme Disease

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SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF CHRONIC LYME DISEASE

by Kristy Fassler, ND

Many of our patients with chronic Lyme Disease may be understandably discouraged that effective and successful treatment can take months and even years to treat depending on the burden of infection. Some patients have been infected for a decade or more and may have one or more co-infections.  The most I have seen in one patient is 8 tick infections found with PCR urine testing.

FORTUNATELY THESE INFECTIONS DO RESOLVE WHEN TREATED AGGRESSIVELY AND SYSTEMATICALLY FOR ALL 3 FORMS OF LYME AND CO-INFECTIONS.   WE CAN BE CONFIDENT THE INFECTIONS ARE CLEARED WHEN THERE IS NO LONGER A HERXHEIMER REACTION FOR 2-3 MONTHS AND EVERY FORM OF INFECTION HAS BEEN TREATED.

A March 28, 2019 article published by Discovery Medicine regarding the treatment of persistent Lyme Disease shares the problematic nature of treating the three forms of Borrelia:  spirochetes, persister or round body forms and biofilm colonies which evade the immune system and many antibiotics.  The article concludes that after 35 or more days of 3 different infused antibiotics most of the 3 forms were finally eradicated in mice.  Biopsies of mouse tissue were stained to visualize the three different forms of infection at different intervals during treatment.  See below for link to article and photos of 3 forms of infection.

The 3 antibiotics infused in mice each day were doxycycline, ceftriaxone (rocephin) and daptomycin. There have been no human studies to date with this combination of medications. An obvious challenge in a human study is the need to biopsy muscle, brain, heart and other tissues to check if the 3 forms of infection are still present in these tissues.

If a human were to be treated with the same antibiotics infused in the mice study, it would require a PICC line and 3 to 4 hours per IV treatment for at least 35 days to treat persistent Lyme.  (Not necessarily co-infections) As I consider the side effects of the antibiotics utilized along with the known concerns of antibiotic resistance over time, the microbiome disruption and resultant intestinal permeability and fungal infections, I am grateful to have effective alternatives to prescribe for patients.

Intravenous Laser Therapy in treating Chronic Lyme Disease

One alternative I have witnessed very good success with in patients with chronic tick infections is intravenous laser therapy or Photodynamic therapy (PDT).  The advantages of this therapy are:

* It treats multiple infections; mold, bacteria, viruses, parasites. (New research is showing effectiveness in treating HIV, malaria and Hepatitis C as well as Lyme and Babesia)
* Antibiotic resistance is not a concern (no evolution of super bugs that resist antibiotic treatment)
* The intestinal microbiome does not appear to be adversely affected. I haven’t seen diarrhea or C. Diff infections.
* There are other advantages to the patient, including immune stimulation, improved circulation and improved mitochondrial function supporting healing and improved energy.

I have overseen a handful of chronically infected patients treated with 30-40 IV laser treatments do very well, including some with complete resolution of symptoms.  These patients were severely sick with multiple infections when they started treatment.  Oral antibiotics and antimicrobial herbs have been prescribed periodically to be taken in addition to the IV laser treatments.  Several patients have only done IV laser photodynamic therapy and are much improved after 10-15 treatments but they are not long term chronically infected patients.

I am happy to discuss this topic further and invite your questions to: info@naturopathic-doctors.com

Discovery Medicine Article link: http://www.discoverymedicine.com/Jie-Feng/2019/03/persister-biofilm-microcolony-borrelia-burgdorferi-causes-severe-lyme-arthritis-in-mouse-mo-del/

2019-06-25T16:36:58+00:00June 25th, 2019|